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Winter 2011 Passivhaus in Scotland
GBmag Winter 2011
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Passivhaus in Scotland: A place where four seasons in one day can be a regular occurrence hardly seems like a realistic climate in which to achieve buildings that boast extremely low energy consumption, coupled with superior internal comfort levels. However, Steff Bell and many others believe that the Passivhaus standard has allowed such buildings to be achieved in Scotland and in most cases with ease. Given the success so far, could this standard provide a benchmark for future construction in the country, and the production of energy efficient buildings ...

Lancaster Co-housing Project - Part 2: - Work has now started on site on the largest certified Passivhaus co-housing project in the UK with forty one individual households, ranging from one bed flats to three bed family houses, along with shared community facilities. In this part two article we will cover works in progress on site with regard the foundation/ground slab detail and an overview of how we have designed the project to the Passivhaus standard.. Alan Clarke and Andrew Yeats report ...

Largest Zero Carbon Homes project in UK: - Wakefield and District Housing (WDH), a ‘registered provider’ with more than 31,000 homes, opened the doors to Park Dale, the UK’s largest zero carbon housing development at an official launch event recently. Working closely with community regeneration specialist, Keepmoat, and property design and management consultants, NPS, this pioneering £12 million project consists of 91 homes to level 6 of the government’s Code for Sustainable Homes. From the outset Park Dale, in Airedale, West Yorkshire, was designed to offer a realistic and affordable solution to achieve zero carbon at a large scale.

Can Solar PV Survive? In our Autumn 2010 issue, we reported on the government’s new feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme, which was intended to promote a faster take up of PVs and other renewables. This clearly worked – but now the government has changed its mind ! Jerry Clark reports on the harsh cuts to the FIT announced on 31st October. ...

Local AECB groups, A good way to stay inspired: AECB – the sustainable building association has a network of local groups across the UK and Scotland providing an opportunity to meet with AECB members and their visiting guests in your region. Debbie Mauger and Gill Rivers brings us up to date on what has been going on in some of the more active groups recently ...

Spiders Love Woodworm: Despite the recent shift towards safer chemical treatments for woodworm it is clear that they still have an environmental impact. A recent study has demonstrated that spiders may offer the ultimate green alternative ‘potential’ as bio-predators in reducing or eliminating woodworm infestation says Charles Hippisley-Cox ...

Achieving Zero Carbon in Conservation Areas: Conservation areas are a snapshot of the older housing stock in the UK - with protection imposed by government policy to maintain their place in our cultural heritage. Rather than preserve them in aspic, they also need to make their own contribution to mitigating climate change, representing as they do 1.2 million homes, or nearly 5% of total housing stock, which, if not upgraded with energy efficiency measures, will generally perform poorly. Tim Hulse investigates the potential and pitfalls...

Self sufficient in Electricity - part 4 - wind power: In recent issues Keith Hall outlined his efforts to avoid using the national electricity grid and become self sufficient in electricity. In this fourth part of the story he moves on to discuss the second of the three types of renewable electricity generation he has employed - wind power. Be warned, there is a dearth of scientific analysis in the following story but practical observations and occasional conjecture abound!

Also:
The forum debate
Insiders - reports from around the industry

And loads more. 68 pages, perfect bound


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PDF Version of: Winter 2011 Passivhaus in Scotland - £4.00
Cover story: A place where four seasons in one day can be a regular occurrence hardly seems like a realistic climate in which to achieve buildings that boast extremely low energy consumption, coupled with superior internal comfort levels. However, Steff Bell and many others believe that the Passivhaus standard has allowed such buildings to be achieved in Scotland and in most cases with ease. Given the success so far, could this standard provide a benchmark for future construction in the country, and the production of energy efficient buildings.

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