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Registration Fee for Green Building Forum
Membership of the Green Building forum is free but there is a small, one-time registration fee of £5.00 (there is no VAT charge) We make this charge to help cover the administration costs of this busy forum. However, you can recoup this cost easily on future purchases of Green Building Press publications as we now give 10% discount to forum members.


Thermal Bypass

Thermal Bypass
The impact of natural and forced convection upon building performance. There is mounting evidence to suggest that buildings that are being designed to achieve thermal performance standards, including the Building Regulations, are in fact consuming in excess of 40% more energy than the predicted values. In some cases the increase in energy consumption can be up to 70% greater than that predicted, says Mark Siddall.

An eight page article. First published in June 2009




PDF version of Water - Summer 2004

PDF version of Water - Summer 2004
This issue highlights the potential severe water shortages that lie ahead for many parts of the UK. Also greenwich Millennium Village, Solar school, rainwater recycling, natural swimming pools, home sickness, designing and building a natural studio and much more.


GBmag Summer 2010

PDF Version of: Zero carbon in the city - Summer 2010
Existing buildings are often the neglected Cinderellas of the green construction world. Less glamorous and less visible than new buildings, they are also easier to overlook in their potential for massive carbon reductions. Anthony Gormley writes: “The carbon crisis calls for a re-examination of our faith in the technological basis of Western progress. A change in belief is a cultural change; art and artists are implicated.” Architects and builders even more so. The carbon emissions from the buildings we design today will have implications for decades, or perhaps even centuries into the future. This article, by John Christophers, describes the recently completed ‘zero carbon’, part-retrofit house in Birmingham. The first part summarizes technical aspects of the project, before going on to describe the architectural design and materials.


GBmag Summer 2009

PDF version of First UK PassivHaus- Autumn 2009
By definition, low energy should equal low carbon. Certainly, lower running costs will encourage a wider interest, particularly among the public and commercial sector, but enhanced, not reduced, comfort levels are what John Williamson of JPW believes will be a large factor in the adoption of the PassivHaus standard in the UK until legislation potentially forces the construction industry to adopt a UK derivative.


PDF version of Turning Roofs Green - Spring 2009

PDF version of Turning Roofs Green - Spring 2009
This issue includes yet more articles on pioneering designers and builders who are keen to achieve very low energy buildings and have decided that the best route for achieving this would be the Passivhaus or the AECB’s Gold/Silver standards. We have stories on new-build, renovations and an extension, all inspired by the same dream. These projects are at the cutting edge because an official UK equivalent version of Passivhaus is not yet finalised, so it seems that the standard is actually being developed on-site as fast as it can be documented.


Are breathable roof membranes bad news for bats?

Are breathable roof membranes bad news for bats?
Breathable roofing membranes are probably not the first thing that spring to mind when someone mentions bats. Yet as the built environment sector strives to become more sustainable, breathable membranes are being employed in roof spaces, with the joint aims of reducing heat loss and combating condensation - some of these roof spaces are home to roosting bats. Little is known about the impact these membranes have on bats or even the effects bats could have on the membranes. Stacey Waring reports.

A three page article. First published in June 2010




Self sufficient in electricity

Self sufficient in electricity
Independence from outside influences is an age-old desire of man. It certainly is in me and I think perhaps in all men. What better way to prove our worth than by taking, or trying to take, full control of our own destiny - to be self-sufficient. “Me build fire”, Stone-Age man would have gleefully announced to his wife. Well, this story is a contemporary take on that simple statement. Naivety at its best, many might argue, “but I’m not so sure” says Keith Hall.

A four page article. First published in June 2010




GBmag Autumn 2014

PDF Version of: Autumn 2014: Do you like my ecohome?
Cover story: Skanda Vale is a multi-faith ashram or monastery, located near Carmarthen in Wales. It was established in 1973, and has grown steadily. Now the monks and nuns pride themselves on caring for 90,000 pilgrims a year. They also look after around 200 birds and animals, many of whom have been rescued from abuse or neglect. In 1980 the community were given a young orphaned elephant, Valli, by the Sri Lankan government. Her name means ‘the adorable one’, and indeed, she has grown into a truly adorable, and adored, temple elephant. Olwyn Pritchard reports...


Zero carbon extension and renovation in the city

Zero carbon extension and renovation in the city
Existing buildings are often the neglected Cinderellas of the green construction world. Less glamorous and less visible than new buildings, they are also easier to overlook in their potential for massive carbon reductions. Anthony Gormley writes: “The carbon crisis calls for a re-examination of our faith in the technological basis of Western progress. A change in belief is a cultural change; art and artists are implicated.” Architects and builders even more so. The carbon emissions from the buildings we design today will have implications for decades, or perhaps even centuries into the future. This article, by John Christophers, describes the recently completed ‘zero carbon’, part-retrofit house in Birmingham. The first part summarizes technical aspects of the project, before going on to describe the architectural design and materials.

An eight page article. First published in June 2010




Challenging the concept of breathability

Challenging the concept of breathability
The key role insulation has to play in improving energy efficiency to reduce both carbon emissions and our reliance on dwindling fossil fuel supplies is clear. Unsurprisingly, there is now a wide range of different insulation products on the market to meet this rising demand. However, with such variation in the materials available it is important to be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of each type. Here, Phil Heath of Kingspan Insulation, challenges the idea of ‘breathability’ ...

A two page article. First published in September 2009




GBmag Autumn 2010

PDF Version of: Biomass, a fuel for the 21 century - Winter 2010
Not withstanding that reducing energy consumption is the most pressing requirement for us all, the take-up of biomass heating in the UK and the wider world is, and will continue to be, an essential part of the ‘move’ towards a more sustainable  and safe world. Biomass is a natural, easy to grow and harvest fuel that need not be at the ‘expense’ of other uses for wood. Keith Hall introduces this feaure ... There are some very important factors that make biomass a sustainable choice for heating (where heating is required) and hopefully this feature will highlight some of those facts. Putting aside the discussion regarding whether or not we should still be erecting new buildings that require heating at all, it is clear that we still need heat in some form and will continue to do so for some time, in most new, and certainly almost all, existing building stock.


Green Building Physics - an introduction to lighting

Green Building Physics - an introduction to lighting
The way we use electrical lighting is changing rapidly; first arc lighting, then the incandescent lamp – tomorrow... the LED? In the past we have used all manner of things to provide artificial illumination, and lengthen our day, from firelight to candles. In this first article on lighting, Gavin Harper discusses electrical lighting technologies.

A three page article. First published in June 2010




Green Building Physics - Thermal Comfort

Green Building Physics - Thermal Comfort
In the first of a new series of articles, Gavin Harper goes back to first principles to help us understand some of the basic concepts of building physics – and how these apply to sustainable construction. In this article, we will be examining thermal comfort.

A four page article. First published in April 2009




A very British Passivhaus

A very British Passivhaus
The construction arm of Green Building Store - Green Building Company - has been building what has come to be known as ‘the Denby Dale Passivhaus’ - the first certified Passivhaus in the UK to be built using traditional British cavity wall construction. Bill Butcher and Chris Herring report ...

A five page article. First published in June 2010




Vernacular PassivHaus

Vernacular PassivHaus
A fascinating and appropriate journey has taken place on a former village car park in Chewton Mendip, Somerset. It has seen a dusty corner site evolve from a little used 10 parking space eyesore, to the location for a curving terrace of three homes. They have been built to attain standards that exceed those demanded by PassivHaus for energy consumption and also include other features that respond to important ‘green’ issues. Arthur Bland and David Hayhow provide us with the builder’s and architect’s perspectives.

A six page article. First published in June 2009


   
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